Sudden Collapse in a Dog: Spoil Your Dog Like There Is No Tomorrow

The causes behind your dog’s sudden collapse include anything from an electric shock, poisoning, to endocrine disease and everything in between. 

Spoil your dog like there is no tomorrow. Because you never know when there won’t be one.

Let your dog sniff that fire hydrant. Let him do all the doggy things he wants to do. Let him get dirty. Give him the piece of steak he craves. Spoil your dog like there is no tomorrow.

Because you never know when there won’t be one.

Sudden Collapse in a Dog: Spoil Your Dog Like There Is No Tomorrow

Rufus’ story

There won’t be a tomorrow for Rufus, our neighbor’s dog.

Rufus was 2 years old Bull Mastiff. He was one of the nicest, happiest dogs I’ve met. Always excited, always ready to play, always polite.

Last Saturday I was busy in the kitchen. When I was done I went for a smoke to find Rufus laying on the front lawn, being hosed down. He wasn’t moving, other than spasm-like movements which might have been breathing or not. He was irresponsive to what was going on around him.

Rufus’ collapse

What happened?

The neighbors figured he got a heatstroke; thus the hosing down. Could have been, as it was a hot and humid day. They were out on a walk when he suddenly collapsed.

One thing I knew was, that regardless of the cause, just hosing him down was not going to save him. If it was a heatstroke, he looked quite far gone.

“Listen, you need to take him to the emergency vet,” I said. “If he is to stand a chance, he needs to see a vet now. You need to take him now, trust me on that.”

I gave them a card with the emergency vet’s address and number. Rufus got loaded in the car, covered with wet towels and off they went.

They were gone for quite a while, so I started getting hopeful. 

It’s taking a long time, which to me meant they were doing something, which meant he had a chance.

Rufus is gone

One look at their faces when they returned told me that Rufus did not make it.

The emergency vet declared that it was not a heat stroke after all, but his heart. The heartbeat was very irregular and then he stopped breathing. And that was that.

He was two years old!

With no known history of heart disease.

Spoil your dog like there is no tomorrow. Because you never know when there won’t be one.

Jasmine is the most spoiled dog on the planet. We almost lost her twice. But she pushed through each time. She is eight years old now and living it up.

We are thankful for every day she has.

As she was getting older I used to worry about how long we might still have her in our lives. But now I look at it differently. She is eight years old.

That is eight years she has had that nobody is going to take away from her!

Every spot she wants to sniff, she gets to sniff. Every bit of attention she desires, she gets. Every piece of steak I can give her, I give her.

Spoil your dog like there is no tomorrow. Because you never know when there won’t be one. RIP Rufus.

Related articles:
Why Could a Dog Collapse? Valentino’s Story

Further reading:
Why Is My Dog Collapsing? | Treatment For Dog Fainting or Collapse

Categories: CollapseCollapseConditionsEmergenciesReal-life StoriesSymptoms

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Jana Rade

I am a graphic designer, dog health advocate, writer, and author. Jasmine, the Rottweiler of my life, was the largest female from her litter. We thought we were getting a healthy dog. Getting a puppy from a backyard breeder was our first mistake. Countless veterinary visits without a diagnosis or useful treatment later, I realized that I had to take Jasmine's health care in my own hands. I learned the hard way that merely seeing a vet is not always enough. There is more to finding a good vet than finding the closest clinic down the street. And, sadly, there is more to advocating for your dog's health than visiting a veterinarian. It should be enough, but it often is not. With Jasmine, it took five years to get a diagnosis. Unfortunately, other problems had snowballed for that in the meantime. Jasmine's health challenges became a crash course in understanding dog health issues and how to go about getting a proper diagnosis and treatment. I had to learn, and I had to learn fast. Helping others through my challenges and experience has become my mission and Jasmine's legacy. I now try to help people how to recognize and understand signs of illness in their dogs, how to work with their veterinarian, and when to seek a second opinion. My goal is to save others the steep curve of having to learn things the hard way as I did. That is the mission behind my blog and behind my writing. That is why I wrote Symptoms to Watch for in Your Dog, which has turned out being an award-winning guide to dog owners. What I'm trying to share encompasses 20 years of experience.

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