Articles with emergencies

Are Cuts and Abrasions an Emergency?

Are Cuts and Abrasions an Emergency?

Minor wounds, cuts, and abrasions are the kind of scenario where common sense should rule. You wouldn’t rush your kid to an emergency with a scraped knee, and you don’t need to do that with your dog either. But … Abrasions An abrasion is a wound caused by superficial damage to the skin … wikipedia Abrasions further break down into…

Continue reading …

Is Inability to Urinate an Emergency?

Is Inability to Urinate an Emergency?

What can cause the inability to urinate? The causes break down into two groups. In any case, though, your dog needs to see a veterinarian immediately. Urinary obstruction One of them is urinary tract obstruction, either due to a blockage, inflammation or compression of the urethra. The problem behind this can be urinary tract stones tumors urinary disease prostate disease…

Continue reading …

Is Inability to Stand an Emergency?

Is Inability to Stand an Emergency?

There is a difference between acute inability to stand and an ongoing condition where the dog might have already diagnosed issues such as spinal injury or any other problem causing paralysis, extreme weakness or loss of balance. A chronic, established condition isn’t an emergency unless something abruptly changes. For example, after her hyperthermia horror, Jasmine was unable to get up…

Continue reading …

Is Severe Lethargy an Emergency?

Is Severe Lethargy an Emergency?

Lethargy is a state in which your dog is uninterested in or unable to go about their normal activities. Your dog will act tired, weak, and lacking energy. Lethargy, particularly severe, most definitely, absolutely is an emergency. Your dog is either very ill, poisoned, in extreme pain or having an adverse reaction to a drug or medication. Non-specific but important…

Continue reading …

Is Reduced Activity an Emergency?

Is Reduced Activity an Emergency?

The key point in determining whether reduced activity is an emergency is the distinction between reduced activity and lethargy. If your dog only wants to walk instead of running, go outside for thirty minutes instead of an hour, prefers chewing on a toy instead of chasing one, that’s reduced activity. Your dog is still doing what they normally would but…

Continue reading …