Surviving The Post-Op: After Your Dog’s ACL/CCL Surgery

You’re probably all worried, I was too. Let me start with the good news. Based on my experience with Jasmine’s bi-lateral ACL surgeries I truly believe that the post-op recovery is actually going to be much easier for your dog than it will be for you.

Dog Knee Injuries: Surviving the Post-Op

Dogs are survivors. They don’t sulk or complain, they take what there is and make the best of it. They have an amazing ability to adapt and make things work. This is probably one of the times when the difference between a dog and a human attitude is the most profound.

The other good news is that from the moment of the surgery your dog is on his way to get well. That’s what I kept telling Jasmine–and more importantly myself–when I was counting the days. You are one day closer to getting your life back. And then two …

Prepare your home

It will make it easier for both you and your dog if you plan ahead and get some things ready before the surgery. Of course, if you have a little dog some of the points below won’t apply, because you can simply carry your dog around. However, large breed dogs are more likely to suffer an ACL injury.

After your dog comes home, you will have to restrict his movement. Prepare a comfortable and safe place for your dog, ideally somewhere near you.

He will not be allowed to use stairs. This means he will be restricted to the main floor for some time. Think about how you’re going to make this work so your dog is excluded from your life as little as possible. Good spirits are important for physical healing.

We dealt with that by moving all our activity to the main floor, and because our bedrooms are on the second floor, I slept with Jasmine in the kitchen. Clearly, you don’t have to go to the same extreme, but whatever you’re going to do, have it figured out beforehand.

Slippery surfaces can be a danger to your dog after the surgery. You can assist your dog when walking on them, or you can do what we did–buy some cheap carpets and rugs and cover the entire main floor. Problem solved.

Are there a couple of stairs on the way to his potty place? Again, you can assist your dog by supporting him with a towel (towel-walking) or, if you have the means, you can build a simple ramp. Jasmine didn’t like the idea of towel-walking at all. She would either freeze or move awkwardly backward – clearly not very helpful when trying to assist her up and down the steps. She did, however, love her ramp. We also covered it with an outdoor rug to make a safe non-slippery surface.

If getting a ramp, make sure it’s comfortably wide and with a very mild incline for safety (which means it will need to be fairly long as well).

Prepare your dog

If you never tried towel-walking your dog before, you might want to try and see how he responds to it. Place a towel under his belly and support his weight when walking. There are also some cool products designed for this purpose. In any case, I think it’s a good idea to have this figured out beforehand also.

Prepare yourself

The post-op is going to be quite similar regardless of which surgery you choose for your dog. It will be a long journey. Seeing the light at the end of the tunnel is what will help you to get through it.

Prepare yourself for a visual shock. When your dog comes back home, his leg will be shaved, bruised and with a long incision. He might be quite spaced out from the surgery and from the meds. When Jasmine came home, her eyes looked quite bewildered. He will be using the leg very little or not at all.

Do your best to make him comfortable. Plenty of deep sleep is important for the healing process.

Have your vet explain the post-op rehabilitation to you in detail. You will probably get a printed sheet – read it and ask questions until you understand everything you need to do.

Taking care of the incision

Keep an eye on the incision. Make sure it remains dry and clean, do not allow your dog to lick it. This can lead to infections and neither you or your dog need additional trouble. The incision shouldn’t be bleeding or oozing.

TIP: We found that Preparation H (yes, the hemorrhoid ointment) works wonders in promoting faster deep wound healing.

The PROM is not a party

Passive Range of Motion exercise (PROM) is an important part of your dog’s post-op program. It is a flexing and stretching exercise that promotes joint health prevents contraction of the muscles and stimulates blood and lymphatic flow.

However, there is a good chance your dog won’t like it at all. Have your veterinarian show you how to do the exercise properly. I recommend you consider muzzling your dog for the exercise (simple cloth muzzle works fine).

Don’t use force. If the joint is too painful to do the exercise, consult your veterinarian about pain management.

Bringing it home

Safety is the most important part of the post-op period. Do everything you can to prevent any mishaps. One bad slip or one bad jump of the couch can be disastrous.

Follow your dog’s post-op schedule religiously. The better you do with that, the better and faster will your dog recover.

Figure out ways of entertaining your dog during his restricted exercise period. Try some clicker training. Get a lot of yummy chew toys. You can even try some dog companion videos, such as the ones by Stanley Coren.

It will feel like a lifetime. But that too shall pass.

Wishing your dog perfect recovery

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Talk to Me about ACL Injuries

Categories: CCL injuriesJoint issuesKnee issues

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Jana Rade

I am a graphic designer, dog health advocate, writer, and author. Jasmine, the Rottweiler of my life, was the largest female from her litter. We thought we were getting a healthy dog. Getting a puppy from a backyard breeder was our first mistake. Countless veterinary visits without a diagnosis or useful treatment later, I realized that I had to take Jasmine's health care in my own hands. I learned the hard way that merely seeing a vet is not always enough. There is more to finding a good vet than finding the closest clinic down the street. And, sadly, there is more to advocating for your dog's health than visiting a veterinarian. It should be enough, but it often is not. With Jasmine, it took five years to get a diagnosis. Unfortunately, other problems had snowballed for that in the meantime. Jasmine's health challenges became a crash course in understanding dog health issues and how to go about getting a proper diagnosis and treatment. I had to learn, and I had to learn fast. Helping others through my challenges and experience has become my mission and Jasmine's legacy. I now try to help people how to recognize and understand signs of illness in their dogs, how to work with their veterinarian, and when to seek a second opinion. My goal is to save others the steep curve of having to learn things the hard way as I did. That is the mission behind my blog and behind my writing. That is why I wrote Symptoms to Watch for in Your Dog, which has turned out being an award-winning guide to dog owners. What I'm trying to share encompasses 20 years of experience.

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